Determinacion de la pobreza Censo


Following the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) Statistical Policy Directive 14, the Census Bureau uses a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition to determine who is in poverty.  If a family’s total income is less than the family’s threshold, then that family and every individual in it is considered in poverty.  The official poverty thresholds do not vary geographically, but they are updated for inflation using Consumer Price Index (CPI-U).  The official poverty definition uses money income before taxes and does not include capital gains or noncash benefits (such as public housing, Medicaid, and food stamps).

 

Income
used to compute
poverty status:
 

  • Money income
    • Includes earnings, unemployment compensation, workers’ compensation, Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, public assistance, veterans’ payments, survivor benefits, pension or retirement income, interest, dividends, rents, royalties, income from estates, trusts, educational assistance, alimony, child support, assistance from outside the household, and other miscellaneous sources.
    • Noncash benefits (such as food stamps and housing subsidies) do not count.
    • Before taxes.
    • Excludes capital gains or losses.
    • If a person lives with a family, add up the incomeof all family members. (Non-relatives, such as housemates, do not count.)
Measure of need
(poverty thresholds):
  • Poverty thresholds are the dollar amounts used to determine poverty status
  • Each person or family is assigned one out of 48 possible poverty thresholds
  • Thresholds vary according to:
    • Size of the family
    • Ages of the members
  • The same thresholds are used throughout the United States(do not vary geographically)
  • Updated annually for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U).
  • Although the thresholds in some sense reflect families needs,
    • they are intended for use as a statistical yardstick, not as a complete description of what people and families need to live
    • many government aid programs use a different poverty measure, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines, or multiples thereof
  • Poverty thresholds were originally derived in 1963-1964, using:
    • U.S. Department of Agriculture food budgets designed for families under economic stress
    • Data about what portion of their income families spent on food

Computation:
  • If total family income is less than the threshold appropriate for that family,
    • the family is in poverty
    • all family members have the same poverty status
    • for individuals who do not live with family members,their own income is compared with the appropriate threshold
  • If total family income equals or is greater than the threshold,the family (or unrelated individual) is not in poverty

Example:
  • Family A has five members: two children, their mother, father, and great-aunt.
Mother:

$10,000

Father:

7,000

Great-aunt:

10,000

First child:

0

Second child:

0

Total family income:

$27,000

  • Compare total family income with their family’s threshold.

Income / Threshold = $27,000 / $26,338 = 1.03

  • Since their income was greater than their threshold, Family A is not “in poverty” according to the official definition.
  • The income divided by the threshold is called the Ratio of Income to Poverty.
    • Family A’s ratio of income to poverty was 1.03.
  • The difference in dollars between family income and the family’s poverty threshold is called the Income Deficit (for families in poverty) or Income Surplus (for families above poverty)

— Family A’s income surplus was $663 (or $27,000 – $26,338).

People whose poverty
status cannot
be determined:
 

  • Unrelated individuals under age 15 (such as foster children)
    • income questions are asked of people age 15 and older
    • if someone is under age 15 and not living with a family member, we do not know their income
    • since we cannot determine their poverty status, they are excluded from the “poverty universe” (table totals)
  • People in:
    • institutional group quarters (such as prisons or nursing homes)
    • college dormitories
    • military barracks
    • living situations without conventional housing (and who are not in shelters)
Authority behind
official poverty measure:
 

  • The official measure of poverty was established by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in Statistical Policy Directive 14.
  • To be used by federal agencies in their statistical work.
  • Government aid programs do not have to use the official poverty measure as eligibility criteria.
    • Many government aid programs use a different poverty measure, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) poverty guidelines, or variants thereof
    • Each aid program may define eligibility differently
  • Official poverty data come from the Current Population Survey (CPS) Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC), formerly called the Annual Demographic Supplement or simplythe “March Supplement.”

ndscape & legal printer options to print this table)

Poverty Thresholds for 2004 by Size of Family and Number of Related Children Under 18 Years
                     
  Weighted Related children under 18 years  
    Size of family unit average                   Eight
  thresholds   None    One    Two   Three   Four   Five   Six   Seven  or more
                     
One person (unrelated individual)….           9,645                  
  Under 65 years…………………..           9,827        9,827              
  65 years and older………………..           9,060        9,060                
                     
Two persons……………………….         12,334                  
  Householder under 65 years………..         12,714       12,649       13,020              
  Householder 65 years and older……         11,430       11,418       12,971              
                     
Three persons……………………..         15,067       14,776       15,205       15,219          
Four persons………………………         19,307       19,484       19,803       19,157       19,223          
Five persons………………………         22,831       23,497       23,838       23,108       22,543       22,199        
Six persons……………………….         25,788       27,025       27,133       26,573       26,037       25,241       24,768      
Seven persons……………………..         29,236       31,096       31,290       30,621       30,154       29,285       28,271       27,159    
Eight persons……………………..         32,641       34,778       35,086       34,454       33,901       33,115       32,119       31,082       30,818  
Nine persons or more……………….         39,048       41,836       42,039       41,480       41,010       40,240       39,179       38,220       37,983       36,520
Source:  U.S. Census Bureau.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poverty Thresholds 2004
(Use landscape & legal printer options to print this table)

Poverty Thresholds for 2004 by Size of Family and Number of Related Children Under 18 Years
                     
  Weighted Related children under 18 years  
    Size of family unit average                   Eight
  thresholds   None    One    Two   Three   Four   Five   Six   Seven  or more
                     
One person (unrelated individual)….           9,645                  
  Under 65 years…………………..           9,827        9,827              
  65 years and older………………..           9,060        9,060                
                     
Two persons……………………….         12,334                  
  Householder under 65 years………..         12,714       12,649       13,020              
  Householder 65 years and older……         11,430       11,418       12,971              
                     
Three persons……………………..         15,067       14,776       15,205       15,219          
Four persons………………………         19,307       19,484       19,803       19,157       19,223          
Five persons………………………         22,831       23,497       23,838       23,108       22,543       22,199        
Six persons……………………….         25,788       27,025       27,133       26,573       26,037       25,241       24,768      
Seven persons……………………..         29,236       31,096       31,290       30,621       30,154       29,285       28,271       27,159    
Eight persons……………………..         32,641       34,778       35,086       34,454       33,901       33,115       32,119       31,082       30,818  
Nine persons or more……………….         39,048       41,836       42,039       41,480       41,010       40,240       39,179       38,220       37,983       36,520
Source:  U.S. Census Bureau.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poverty Thresholds for 2009 by Size of Family and Number of Related Children Under 18 Years

Size of family unit

Related children under 18 years

None

One

Two

Three

Four

Five

Six

Seven

Eight or more

One person (unrelated individual)                  
Under 65 years 11,161                
65 years and over 10,289                
Two people                  
Householder under 65 years 14,366 14,787              
Householder 65 years and over 12,968 14,731              
Three people 16,781 17,268 17,285            
Four people 22,128 22,490 21,756 21,832          
Five people 26,686 27,074 26,245 25,603 25,211        
Six people 30,693 30,815 30,180 29,571 28,666 28,130      
Seven people 35,316 35,537 34,777 34,247 33,260 32,108 30,845    
Eight people 39,498 39,847 39,130 38,501 37,610 36,478 35,300 35,000  
Nine people or more 47,514 47,744 47,109 46,576, 45,701 44,497 43,408 43,138 41,476
Note: The poverty thresholds are updated each year using the change in the average annual Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U). Since the average annual CPI-U for 2009 was lower than the average annual CPI-U for 2008, poverty thresholds for 2009 are slightly lower than the corresponding thresholds for 2008.
SOURCE:  U.S. Census Bureau.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poverty Thresholds 2002
(Use landscape & legal printer options to print this table)

Poverty Thresholds for 2002 by Size of Family and Number of Related Children Under 18 Years  
(Dollars)  
 
_______________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ _______________________________________________ ____________________ __________  
| |       Related children under 18 years    
|  Weighted | ___________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________ _ _________ _ _________ _ _________ _ _________ _ __________
    Size of family unit |  average | | | | | | | | |   Eight  
| thresholds |   None |    One |    Two |   Three |   Four |   Five |   Six |   Seven |  or more
___________________________________________ | ___________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | _________ | _________ | ____________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | _________ | _________ | __________
| | | | | | | | | |
One person (unrelated individual).…….. |           9,183 | | | | | | | | |
  Under 65 years………………..………… |           9,359 |        9,359 | | | | | | | |
  65 years and over……………..………… |           8,628 |        8,628 | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | | |
Two persons…………………….…………. |         11,756 | | | | | | | | |
  Householder under 65 years……..…… |         12,110 |       12,047 |       12,400 | | | | | | |
  Householder 65 years and over………. |         10,885 |       10,874 |       12,353 | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | | |
Three persons…………………..…………. |         14,348 |       14,072 |       14,480 |       14,494 | | | | | |
Four persons………………………………. |         18,392 |       18,556 |       18,859 |       18,244 |       18,307 | | | | |
Five persons……………………………….. |         21,744 |       22,377 |       22,703 |       22,007 |       21,469 |       21,141 | | | |
Six persons…………………….………….. |         24,576 |       25,738 |       25,840 |       25,307 |       24,797 |       24,038 |       23,588 | | |
Seven persons…………………..………… |         28,001 |       29,615 |       29,799 |       29,162 |       28,718 |       27,890 |       26,924 |       25,865 | |
Eight persons…………………..…………. |         30,907 |       33,121 |       33,414 |       32,812 |       32,285 |       31,538 |       30,589 |       29,601 |       29,350 |
Nine persons or more…………….………. |         37,062 |       39,843 |       40,036 |       39,504 |       39,057 |       38,323 |       37,313 |       36,399 |       36,173 |       34,780
___________________________________________ | ___________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | ____________________________________________ | __________
Source:  U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, 2003 Annual Social and Economic Supplement.  

Contact the Demographic Call Center Staff at 301-763-2422 or 1-866-758-1060 (toll free) or visit ask.census.gov for further information on Poverty Statistics.


 

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Housing and Household Economic Statistics Division

 

 

 

 

uarto Mundo: pobreza en los países desarrollados

La distribución desigual de la riqueza en los países del Primer Mundo ha aumentado la distancia que separa a las personas ricas de los grupos más desfavorecidos

 

El crecimiento económico de los países desarrollados ha dado origen a lo que se conoce como Cuarto Mundo, un término que engloba a todas aquellas personas que residen en los países más avanzados, pero se encuentran excluidas o en riesgo de exclusión social. Esta situación se produce cuando la riqueza se distribuye de manera desigual y la línea que separa a ricos de pobres se convierte en abismo. Como solución, se propone incluir a los grupos más desfavorecidos en el proceso productivo y aumentar las partidas económicas. “Las ayudas nunca son suficientes”, se quejan las ONG.

  • Autor: Por AZUCENA GARCÍA
  • Última actualización: 23 de septiembre de 2008

¿Por qué surge?

 
– Imagen: Venus

El término ‘Cuarto Mundo’ fue utilizado por primera vez en los años 70 para designar a aquellas personas que viven en situaciones realmente precarias. Su creador fue el padre Joseph Wresinski, criado en un ambiente muy alejado de la opulencia y que fundó en 1957 la primera asociación contra la exclusión de los más pobres. “El Cuarto Mundo es un pueblo formado por hombres, mujeres y niños que, generación tras generación, se ven excluidos de los derechos fundamentales de los que goza el resto de la sociedad. Se ven excluidos de los progresos sociales y de la participación en la vida asociativa, política, religiosa, cultural, sindical… de sus sociedades. No se cuenta con ellos como interlocutores sino, como mucho, como meros beneficiarios de ayudas”. Así define el término Beatriz Rodríguez-Viña, voluntaria permanente de Movimiento Cuarto Mundo en Madrid.

El término fue utilizado por primera vez en los años 70 para designar a aquellas personas que viven en situaciones realmente precarias

¿Pero cuál es la principal característica de este denominado Cuarto Mundo? Lo más curioso es que surge dentro de lo que se conoce como Primer Mundo. Es en los países más avanzados donde la gran diferencia en el reparto de la riqueza da lugar a dos grandes grupos que ocupan un mismo espacio físico, pero no social. No son casos aislados. Según datos de Médicos del Mundo, sólo en Europa residen más de 40 millones de personas pobres. “Otro de los paradigmas es Estados Unidos, que tiene una economía puntera, pero también un gran porcentaje de personas pobres que viven por debajo de niveles aceptables. Esto es todavía mucho peor de digerir”, reflexiona la vicepresidenta de la ONG, Celina Pereda.

La miseria siempre ha estado presente en nuestra sociedad. Siempre han existido ricos y pobres. Pero es ahora cuando esta diferencia se hace más patente. A medida que la economía del mundo occidental crece, también aumenta el número de personas a las que esta riqueza no llega. Se tiende a pensar que los más pobres viven en los países del Sur. Sorprende reconocer la pobreza ‘al lado de casa’, pero la hay. “En todos los países hay pobres, que son los que menos medios tienen para salir adelante”, apunta Rodríguez-Viña.

Combatir la pobreza es uno de los retos de la sociedad en que vivimos. Si no se encuentra una solución, el problema puede cronificarse y entrar en una espiral de difícil salida. Es necesario poner sobre la mesa las diferentes situaciones de exclusión social y afrontar cada una de ellas con las mejores herramientas. Una de las claves podría ser la incorporación de estas personas al proceso productivo o la elaboración de una Ley de Inclusión Social, reclamada desde hace años por la Asociación Pro-Derechos Humanos de Andalucía. “El crecimiento económico espectacular generado en los últimos años no ha contribuido a garantizar los derechos humanos ni a mejorar las condiciones de vida de todos los ciudadanos porque el umbral de pobreza no ha descendido”, denuncia la APDHA.

 

 

rto Mundo: pobreza en los países desarrollados

La distribución desigual de la riqueza en los países del Primer Mundo ha aumentado la distancia que separa a las personas ricas de los grupos más desfavorecidos

 

Grupos que lo integran

La identidad de quienes conforman el Cuarto Mundo ha variado en paralelo a los cambios sociales. Personas sin hogar, mayores sin recursos, drogodependientes, mujeres, niños o inmigrantes son los grupos que se enfrentan con mayor frecuencia a situaciones de precariedad. El X Informe de Exclusión Social, publicado por Médicos del Mundo en 2005 para analizar la evolución de los últimos diez años, reconoce que la exclusión social y la pobreza “comparten rasgos”. La primera limita el derecho a participar en la sociedad. La segunda impide acceder a los recursos necesarios para realizar las actividades básicas de la vida.

Personas sin hogar, mayores sin recursos, drogodependientes, mujeres, niños e inmigrantes son los grupos más desfavorecidos

Algunas de las causas que llevan a esta situación son la vulnerabilidad ante las drogas o la dificultad de acceso a una vivienda, a la educación o a un empleo remunerado. Contra todas estas dificultades lucha Médicos del Mundo desde 1992. Esta organización cuenta con varios programas de atención a personas excluidas. Los primeros proyectos tenían como objetivo la prevención de VIH/sida, debido a la alta prevalencia de la infección en España durante aquellos años, aunque en la actualidad la inmigración copa buena parte de sus esfuerzos. “Tenemos una población a la que es necesario prestarle atención”, afirma Celina Pereda.

La mayoría de las personas inmigrantes tienen problemas para regularizar su situación, lo que les dificulta el acceso a los recursos sociales, sanitarios, laborales y de vivienda. En el caso de las personas drogodependientes, el consumo de drogas provoca el rechazo de la población y les expone a la marginalidad, el deterioro físico y mental. Por su parte, quienes carecen de hogar son “el conjunto de población más castigado, no sólo por la falta de vivienda, sino también por el desempleo, la desestructuración familiar, el estigma público, el desarraigo social, la enfermedad, el deterioro de su propia identidad y la falta de acceso a los servicios”, explican desde Médicos del Mundo.

Intervenciones

 
– Imagen: Roman Poretski

Si se atiende a las necesidades de los ‘habitantes’ del Cuarto Mundo, las intervenciones con estos grupos están claras. Es necesario resolver cuestiones de tipo sanitario y social, además de fomentar su integración.

  • Atención sanitaria. Con frecuencia, las personas que se mueven en ambientes marginales no tienen acceso al sistema público de sanidad, por lo que es prioritario atender estas necesidades. A veces, se trata de personas mayores con los achaques típicos de la edad o trastornos psicológicos motivados por la dureza de la vida en la calle. Otras son personas drogodependientes con VIH y enfermedades de transmisión sexual, debido a la falta de precauciones. La medida más habitual es el uso de unidades móviles, ya que permiten acercarse a estos grupos sin provocar el rechazo que les causa acudir a un hospital por su cuenta.
  • Atención social. Los trámites burocráticos son una de las principales preocupaciones de quienes quieren superar la marginalidad. En el caso de los inmigrantes, desean regularizar su situación, pero la mayoría desconoce cómo hacerlo. Hay que orientarles en este aspecto y explicar, en general, cómo obtener la tarjeta sanitaria, dónde acudir para recibir ayudas sociales o qué programas de desintoxicación de drogas existen.
  • Fomentar la integración. El primer paso para conseguir este objetivo es garantizar el acceso de todas las personas a los derechos fundamentales. Hay que desarrollar programas que les permitan la integración social, regularizar su situación administrativa o superar los problemas con las drogas y el alcohol, pero también son necesarios programas de sensibilización para que toda la sociedad se implique en este objetivo.

Paginación dentro de este contenido

 

 

 

 

1

¿Globalización o apartheid a escala global?

Samir Amin

Texto presentado en la Conferencia Mundial Contra el Racismo de Durban

(Sudáfrica, 28 agosto–1 septiembre 2001)

Texto cedido por su autor al CSCA. Traducción del inglés de Vanesa Casanova Fernández

© CSCAweb – Septiembre 2001

http://www.nodo50.org/csca • e-Mail: csca@nodo50.org

La confusión creada por el discurso dominante entre los conceptos de “economía de mercado libre” y “capitalismo” es la causa principal de la peligrosa tendencia a relajar las críticas hacia las políticas que se están poniendo práctica. “Mercado”, término que evidentemente hace referencia a la competencia, no es igual a “capitalismo”, cuyo contenido está específicamente definido por los límites impuestos a la competencia implícitos en el monopolio de la propiedad privada, incluyendo el control oligopólico que ejercen ciertos grupos mediante la exclusión de otros. “Mercado” y “capitalismo” son conceptos diferentes, siendo el

capitalismo real justo lo contrario de lo que constituye el mercado imaginario.

Por otra parte, el capitalismo entendido en sentido abstracto como modo de producción, se basa en un mercado integrado por tres dimensiones: un mercado para los productos del trabajo social, un mercado financiero, y un mercado de trabajo. Sin embargo, el capitalismo entendido como un sistema global real se basa en la expansión universal del mercado únicamente sobre las dos primeras dimensiones [mencionadas], dado que la creación de un auténtico mercado de trabajo mundial se ve oscurecida por la existencia perpetua de fronteras políticas nacionales, a pesar de la globalización de la economía; globalización que se ve, por lo tanto, siempre truncada. En consecuencia, el capitalismo real es necesariamente polarizador a escala global, y el desarrollo desigual que genera se ha convertido en la contradicción más violenta y creciente que no puede ser superada según la lógica del capitalismo.

Los “centros” son el producto de la Historia, que permitió el establecimiento en ciertas regiones del sistema capitalista de una hegemonía nacional burguesa y de un Estado que bien puede ser calificado denacional-capitalista. La burguesía y el Estado burgués son, en este contexto, inseparables; [así], es únicamente la llamada ideología “liberal” la que, contrariamente a todas las expectativas, puede permitirse hablar de economía capitalista, dejando el Estado a un lado. El Estado burgués asume un carácter nacional cuando controla el proceso de acumulación, ciertamente dentro de los límites impuestos desde el exterior, pero ello ocurre así cuando tales limitaciones se ven en gran medida relativizadas por su propia capacidad para responder a su propias acciones, o incluso de tomar parte en la formulación de las mismas.

Por su parte, las “periferias” se definen simplemente en términos negativos: son regiones queno se han establecido como centros del sistema capitalista global. Por lo tanto, representan a países y regiones que no controlan en el ámbito local el proceso de acumulación [de la riqueza], que consecuentemente se ve influenciado por limitaciones externas. Por esta razón, las periferias no están “estancadas”, si bien su desarrollo no ha sido similar al que ha caracterizado al centro en las sucesivas fases de la expansión global del capitalismo. La burguesía y el capital local no están necesariamente ausentes del escenario socio-político local, y las periferias no son sinónimo de “sociedades pre-capitalistas”. Sin embargo, la existencia formal del Estado tampoco es sinónimo del Estado nacional-capitalista (incluso cuando la burguesía controla ampliamente la maquinaria estatal), puesto que no controla el proceso de acumul

 

 

 

 

Responder

Introduce tus datos o haz clic en un icono para iniciar sesión:

Logo de WordPress.com

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de WordPress.com. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Imagen de Twitter

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Twitter. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Foto de Facebook

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Facebook. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Google+ photo

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Google+. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Conectando a %s

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: